Jimi Hendrix-worn vest brings $30,000 at auction

By Susan Sliwicki

DALLAS — The gypsy-style vest worn by iconic guitarist Jimi Hendrix sold for $30,000 to lead Heritage Auctions’ Entertainment and Music Memorabilia Signature Auction.

The brown velvet and gold silk brocade costume had been given as a gift to Stevens Weiss, Hendrix’s attorney and friend in 1969. The auction, held Dec. 14, 2012, sold 94 percent by value and realized more than $850,000.

Elvis Lord Elgin direct read watch

This Elvis Presley owned and worn Lord Elgin “direct read” watch (Lord Elgin 21j, 1950s) was worn by The King for a few years, then given away to his friend, Charlie Hodge, in the early 1960s. The watch, which still runs, is in exceptional condition, from the flexible, gold wristband to the 14k gold-filled case itself.

The 1957 Gretsch Roundup 6130 electric guitar owned and played by Conway Twitty sold for $15,000. The instrument featured an exquisitely detailed, hand-tooled leather cover.
A Lord Elgin watch, owned and worn by Elvis Presley, sold for $11,250.

“Music collectors are a discriminating bunch, and we’re proud to once again offer them some of the rarest items of the year,” said Garry Shrum, Hertiage’s consignment director for music memorabilia. “Once again, you can’t underestimate the power of a fan who wants an autograph or a personally-owned item from their favorite star.”

Lots related to The Beatles and Elvis Presley offered repeated proof of that power.

Presley’s signed 1953 high school yearbook sold for $8,438. And the KWKH Shure microphone used by Elvis Presley and many other stars between 1955 and 1975 brought $6,250. It’s the same mic used on Dec. 15, 1956, by Louisiana Hayride announcer Horace Logan when he first coined the phrase “Elvis has left the building.”

Elvis Presley-used Shure microphone

The KWKH Shure microphone used by Elvis Presley and many other stars between 1955 and 1975 brought $6,250. It’s the same mic used on Dec. 15, 1956, by Louisiana Hayride announcer Horace Logan when he first coined the phrase “Elvis has left the building.” Photo courtesy Heritage Auctions.

Top Beatles-related lots include a highly-desirable Beatles Shea Stadium concert poster from the band’s historic 1965 tour, which sold for $11,250; a John Lennon “Bag One” case and original Erotic No. 2 lithograph, 181/300, sold for $7,500; a copy of “The White Album” autographed by John Lennon in 1975 sold for $5,938; a Lennon-signed “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” album cover brought $5,938; a lot featuring Lennon’s art and a letter sent to Crawdaddy Magazine editor Greg Mitchell in 1975 sold for $5,313; a Hofner bass guitar signed by Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr sold for $5,156; a trove of notes, letters and a mockup relating to The Beatles controversial Butcher-themed album cover for the “Yesterday and Today” album brought $5,000; and rare circa 1963 complete set of autographs of the Fab Four sold for $4,000.

A Gibson Epiphone G-1275 electric double neck guitar signed by Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Paul Jones — the three surviving members of the original Led Zeppelin lineup — sold for $7,500. And an RIAA Gold Record Award for the band’s “Houses of The Holy” album brought $4,063.

Recordings were also a hot ticket at the auction. A low-numbered copy of The Beatles’ 1968 eponymous LP, also known as “The White Album,” sold for $13,750. Numbered A0000023, the album was given to Paul McCartney’s girlfriend, Jane Asher, before the record was made available to the public.

Rolling Stones Let It Bleed rare multicolored pressing

This multicolored vinyl pressing of The Rolling Stones’ “Let It Bleed” album (London NPS-4, 1969, below) sold for $6,250 via Heritage Auctions.

A multicolored vinyl pressing of The Rolling Stones’ “Let It Bleed” album (London NPS-4, 1969, below) sold for $6,250. The rare-variant pressing originally was intended only for London Records executives; it is one of two copies known to exist.

A rare Buddy Holly acetate — “Gotta Roll”/“I Don’t Care Anymore” (Soundcraft, 1955) — sold for $3,125.

 

Leave a Reply