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The stories of goldmine

Whatever Chocolate Brown wants, Chocolate Brown gets

Chocolate Brown You Got What I WAnt Paramount12978

In 1930, Blind Blake was one of Paramount’s biggest-selling artists in a career that started in 1926. But since it was during The Great Depression, record sales — along with everything else — plummeted, so he picked up plenty of side gigs, including one with Chocolate Brown.

Catch up with Bad Company guitarist Mick Ralphs

Bad Company

Could Bad Company be the most American British band ever? The band’s music plays with almost comic frequency on classic rock radio stations to this day, and its popularity is evidenced by Rhino’s recent 180-gram vinyl reissues of the band’s first two albums. Guitarist Mick Ralphs talks about living life large and in charge next to Led Zeppelin and both bands’ big man, Peter Grant.

Perception is reality for singer-songwriter P.F. Sloan

P.F. Sloan publicity photo

There’s a lot going on in the world according to P.F. Sloan. For starters, his biography, ‘What’s Exactly The Matter With Me?,’ reads like a musical version of ‘Forrest Gump.’ (And that doesn’t even touch upon the parts of Sloan’s memoirs that even he admits are bizarre.) So what is reality? Sloan has offered up his take here; we’ll leave it up to you (and a box of salt) to decide.

Cliff Richard’s ‘Fabulous Rock ‘n’ Roll Songbook’ honors rock’s roots

Cliff Richard publicity photo

It’s been said that without Cliff Richard, there would be no Beatles, and without Elvis, there would be no Cliff Richard. Unfortunately, the often-overlooked English rocker’s place in American music history has been more of a missing link than that of the rock and roll linchpin he’s perceived to be in the rest of the world. Fortunately, Richard is more than ready to school you in the roots of rock, thanks to ‘The Fabulous Rock ‘N’ Roll Songbook.’

Author seeks definition of ‘Beatleness’ from those who know it best: the fans

The Beatles 1965 copyright Apple Corps Ltd.

In what she calls “the fan story of last century,” sociologist and author Candy Leonard shares the stories of scores of first-generation Beatle-lovers on what it was like to be an original fan. You won’t find interviews with band members, lovers, former roadies or anyone even remotely associated with The Beatles in “Beatleness;” these are the words a 9-year-old watching Ed Sullivan on Feb. 9, 1964, a 7-year-old who dreamed of marrying George Harrison, and the pre-teen who refused to cut his hair.