Filled With Sound

Blogged by Mike Greenblatt

3 TRIPPY NEW JAZZ CDs + NEWLY RESTORED JIMI

Jimi

Jimi Hendrix would have loved the three eccentric eclectic (dare I say oddball?) jazz releases covered within. But as a young man, he just wanted to add hot licks in the bands of Little Richard, the Isley Brothers and Curtis Knight. Knight’s use of the future legend is on full display via Legacy’s “You Can’t Use My Name.” They didn’t. Can you pick him out?

3 CDs PROVE TO BE EXEMPLARS OF 3 DIFFERENT GENRES

Tom Paxton photo copyright Michael G. Stewart095

At 77, Tom Paxton has taken over for Pete Seeger, who passed last year at 94, as our link to pure authentic folk music. Rudresh Mahanthappa rules supreme on the alto sax. And New England upstarts The Luxury takes a hint from bands like U2, Pink Floyd and Oasis.

FOUR NEW BLUES CDs KEEP THE GENRE VITAL

Jorma

I was 18 when Jorma and his band Jefferson Airplane rocked my socks off at Woodstock in 1969. I’m 64 now and Jorma is still a thrill. He headlines this installment of “Filled With Sound.” Smokin’ Joe Kubek, Bnois King, Eric Sardinas and Tinsley Ellis are his blues-drenched opening acts.

Four New CDs Spotlight Oldies, Jazz, Blues and Soul

Brad Hatfield - For A Change (Cover)

Four New CDs span the gamut of sound from the avant-garde squeaks, squeals and grunts of John Coltrane and the soul-stirring Chicken Mambo of Fabrizio Poggi at The Spaghetti Juke Joint to Brad Hatfield’s bravery and the everlasting contributions of Bert Berns, a man who died way too soon.

GOING BACK IN TIME

Count Basie

Out of the four legendary artists featured in this current installment of “Filled With Sound,” only fusion pioneer drummer Alphonse Mouzon is still alive. Yet Count Basie, Hank Jones and Stevie Ray Vaughan will always live, in my household and in the households of millions, by what they put down in studios and on stages.

Hot New Disks: Jazz, Blues, Rock and the Great American Songbook

Jeff Coffin

Alice Cooper might be fitting fodder for a film, but that’s not the only pleasure I’ve encountered this week. Markus James finds the missing link between Africa and Mississippi. Annie Lennox can croon a tune for real as she interprets some American delectables. And wonderfully eccentric Jeff Coffin (pictured) continues to amaze with his eclecticism.