Band of brothers

tad-press-cover2.jpgThe fact that Seattle is still standing after the onslaught of grunge is a minor miracle. Tad alone must have leveled its fair share of city blocks with its groove-oriented metal mayhem.

Undoubtedly, the heaviest and loudest of all the grunge acts spewed from the sewers of the great Northwest, Tad — with songs like “Behemoth” and “Wood Goblins,” and albums like God’s Balls, Inhaler and Infrared Riding Hood — and was led by Tad Doyle, a mountain of a man who looked like a lumberjack about to go on a killing spree. Tipping the scales at 300 pounds, Doyle was a powerful performer with explosive guitar riffs, the comic timing of a stand-up comedian and amazing energy.

A new DVD documentary, titled “Busted Circuits And Ringing Ears,” from MVD Visual will be released Feb. 19, and it pulls no punches in telling the story of Tad. Look for a review in the March 14 edition of Goldmine.

Now working on material with a new band called Brothers Of The Sonic Cloth, Doyle looks back fondly on his days with Tad, even though major-label neglect, substance abuse and a revolving-door lineup ended its existence too early.

For his part, Doyle didn’t mind that Tad’s label, the iconic Sub Pop, chose to market him and the band as a group of psycho woodsmen.

“We were rednecks, but we were educated rednecks,” jokes Doyle, who admitted in a recent interview that growing up in Idaho he did cut wood and that he does know how to use an axe.

Writing lyrics from the band’s fevered imagination and real-life experiences, Tad came up with songs that were more than a little unsettling.

“We focused on deviant behavior and explored the underbelly of American society,” says Doyle.

What people don’t know about Tad is that, despite the violence, raw power and the sheer volume of its music, the band, according to Doyle, was heavily influenced by, and had a “sincere respect” for, Motown and early funk. Without that background, Tad would have been just another loud, angry metal band. With it, they had booty-shaking grooves that made their music so much more than just metal or punk.

For the lowdown on the new Tad DVD, visit www.mvdb2b.com.

To hear a podcast with Doyle, watch the podcast section of the www.goldminemag.com site for it to be posted. A feature story is planned for a later edition of Goldmine.

Brothers Of The Sonic Cloth does have a myspace page. Unfortunately, I can’t get the link to work right now. But, just Google it, and you’ll get there.

Also, go to www.subpop.com and view Tad’s artist page at http://www.subpop.com/artists/tad

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