Beatles rock September 2015 Market Watch

The Beatles once again shook the auction space. For the Market Watch this month Goldmine highlighted mostly auction lots from Heritage Auctions‘ “Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction” in New York, which included the Holy Grail of Beatles records, the “Butcher Cover” of “Yesterday And Today.” Two Butchers made the list: an “EX” condition “first state” stereo album and an even better “mint” sealed copy.

butcher cover bealtes unsealed

5. Beatles – “Yesterday And Today”
Sold For: $9,375.00 (4 Bids)
Listed As: “Beatles Yesterday And Today First State Stereo “Butcher” Cover (Capitol ST-2553, 1966)”
Genre: Rock
Record Label: Capitol (ST-2553)
Country/Region of Manufacture: U.S.
Release Year: 1966
Format: 12-Inch, 33rpm
Special Attributes: First State, Stereo, “Butcher” cover
Record Grading: EX
Sleeve Grading: EX
Seller: Heritage Auctions
Seller’s Comments: “A beautiful first state copy of the rare stereo version of the Beatles’ most infamous release. This one-owner LP was the personal possession of a music critic for a major American newspaper, and has been consigned by his family. Minor professional restoration has recently been performed to the top right and library spine, and it is ready for display! There are slight corner dings on the right, a slightly visible 3.5″ horizontal crease to the back right above the RIAA logo, and minor tanning on the back cover. Pressing plant 2. LP: EX-7.5, Sleeve: EX-7.

 

 

vocalion

4. Charlie Patton – “Poor Me/34 Blues”
Sold For: $17,211.11 (19 Bids; starting price $3,000)
Listed As: “CHARLIE PATTON VOCALION 02651 BLUES 78 RPM RECORD E CHARLEY PATTON”
Genre: Blues
Record Label: Vocalion (02651)
Country/Region of Manufacture: U.S.
Release Year: 1934
Format: Shellac,10-Inch, 78rpm
Record Grading: “Very slight signs of wear, maybe some minor scuffing and/or light scratches but a clean copy with little groove wear. (E)”
Seller: Private seller on eBay
Seller’s Comments: “CHARLIE PATTON VOCALION 02651 BLUES 78 RPM RECORD E
POOR ME / 34 BLUES. THIS RECORD WAS RECORDED DURING PATTON’S FINAL SESSIONS BEFORE HIS DEATH IN APRIL 1934. “POOR ME” WAS RECORDED IN FEBRUARY 1934, “34 BLUES” IN JANUARY OF THE SAME YEAR. 34 BLUES IS CONSIDERED TO BE ONE OF HIS GREAT RECORDINGS. PATTON’S MUSIC CAN BE VERY DARK BUT PROBABLY NONE AS DARK AS POOR ME, A SONG HE WROTE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF HIMSELF AFTER HE’S DEAD LOOKING DOWN FROM HEAVEN AT HIS WIFE BERTHA LEE. ROBERT CRUMB DEPICTED THIS IN HIS COMIC ENTITLED “PATTON”. THIS IS A HOLY GRAIL RECORD IN ABSOLUTE TOP CONDITION.

ALL RECORDS PLAY GRADED USING A STANTON 500-ll CARTRIDGE USING A 3.5TE STYLUS.

I AM CURRENTLY SELLING RECORDS FROM LEGENDARY COLLECTOR DON KENT’S RECORD COLLECTION. DON ASKED ME TO DO THIS BEFORE HE PASSED. DON WAS THE FOUNDER OF MAMLISH RECORDS, FLYIN’ CROW AND COUNTRY TURTLE. HE BEGAN COLLECTING BLUES RECORDS AS A YOUNG MAN WHILE LIVING IN CHICAGO WHILE WORKING AT BOB KOESTER’S STORE THE JAZZ RECORD MART. DON AMASSED ONE OF THE GREATEST COLLECTIONS OF BLUES, JAZZ AND COUNTRY RECORDS DURING HIS LIFETIME. HE WAS MY FRIEND AND IT’S AN HONOR TO PASS THESE RECORDS ON TO A NEW GENERATION OF COLLECTORS.”

 

 

Vunderground-acetate
3. Velvet Underground – “And Nico”
Sold For: $18,750.00 (2 Bidders)
Listed As: “Velvet Underground Early US Version Of And Nico 1966 Acetate LP (XTV-122402, 1966)”
Genre: Rock
Release Year: 1966
Country/Region of Manufacture: U.S.
Special Attributes: Acetate LP (“The Scepter Acetate”)
Record Grading: VG-
Seller: Heritage Auctions
Seller’s Comments: “The Scepter Acetate offered here is reputed to be the better of only two known copies (the other is believed to be in the possession of Velvets’ drummer, Moe Tucker). It was found by chance at a New York City street sale in 2004 where it changed hands for 75¢.

Warhol’s goal was to record the entire first Velvet Underground album before they were signed to a recording contract, leaving the recording free from label executives’ tampering and influence. With its groundbreaking style and “taboo” lyrical content, this was to be the Velvets at their purest.

At Scepter Studios in New York in April 1966, The Velvet Underground recorded the contents of the acetate with Norman Dolph and John Licata full-time, and with Warhol part-time. Dolph took the master tapes from these sessions and, in secret, used Columbia Records pressing equipment to make an acetate that he then submitted to Columbia for consideration of release. As legend has it, it was promptly returned, accompanied by a note that Dolph has described as essentially, “Do you think we’re out of our minds?”
The track differences between the acetate versions and the commercial recordings on “The Velvet Underground & Nico” are detailed as follows:

1. “European Son” – completely different version. Guitar solo is much bluesier. Less noisy and experimental. Longer by 2 minutes or so.
2. “Black Angel’s Death Song” – Same take as released version. Different mix.
3. “All Tomorrow’s Parties” – Same take as released version. Different mix.
4. “Li’l Be Your Mirror” – Same take as released version. Radically different mix. No echo on Nico’s vocals. Background vocals on end of song are more subdued.
5. “Heroin” – Completely different take than released version. Guitar line is different. Vocal inflections are different, and a few different lyrics. Drumming is more primitive & off kilter. There is a tambourine dragging throughout.
6. “Femme Fatale” – Same take as released version. Radically different mix. Percussion more prominent. Alternate take on background vocals.
7. “Venus In Furs” – Different take than released version. Vocal inflections completely different. Instrumentation more based around Cales’ violin than the guitar, as in the released version.
8. “I’m Waiting For The Man” – Different take than released version. Guitar line is completely different. Vocal inflections different, and a few different lyrics. No drums, just tambourine. Bluesy solo.
9. “Run Run Run” – Same take as released version. Different mix.

beatles-parlo

2. The Beatles – “P.S. I Love You / Love Me Do”
Sold For: $25,000.00 (6 Bidders)
Listed As: ““Beatles Autographed “P.S. I Love You / Love Me Do” First Pressing 45, One of the First-Ever Signed Beatles Records, in Matted Display (UK, October 6, 1962”
Genre: Rock
Record Label: Parlophone (4949)
Country/Region of Manufacture: U.K.
Release Year: 1962
Format: 7-Inch, 45rpm
Special Attributes:  Autographed, 1st Edition
Record Grading: VG-/EX
Seller: Heritage Auctions
Seller’s Comments: The Beatles’ first single for EMI was released on October 5, 1962. The very next day they traveled the short distance from Liverpool to Widnes in Lancashire for a 4:00 official autograph signing appearance (the first of only three in their career) at Dawson’s Music Shop. For thirty minutes, the Beatles signed copies of their brand new single for fans. This is one of the records signed that day, on the “B” side (P.S. I Love You) label in black ballpoint: “John Lennon XXX”, “Paul McCartney”, “Ringo Starr XX”, and “George Harrison”. The record is handsomely double matted to an overall 19.5″ x 13″ with a vintage 7.25″ x 7.5″ B&W glossy photo of the Beatles taken during a January 1963 appearance at Brian Epstein’s NEMS record store in Liverpool. A rare and very desirable piece of Beatle history. Disc VG-EX 6. From the Uwe Blaschke Beatles Collection. COA from Heritage Auctions.

According to the excellent reference book “Beatles For Sale” on Parlophone Records by Bruce Spizer and Frank Daniels (New Orleans: 498 Productions, 2011), this is one of the “few thousand” pressed for the October 5th release with the very first version of the record label, referenced in the book as PAR 4949.01A(i). The main indication is that “the initial labels, 01A(i), have the Ardmore & Beechwood publishing credit left-aligned and slightly indented so that the ‘B’ is above the ‘XC’ in the matrix number prefix 7XCE.” All the other “tells” match including the tax code pressed into the trail off area being “ZT”.

 

 

beatles-butcher

1. The Beatles – “Yesterday And Today“
Sold For: $75,000.00 (8 Bidders)
Listed As: “Beatles Yesterday And Today Sealed First State Stereo “Butcher Cover” LP in GEM MINT 10 Condition (Capitol, 1966)”
Genre: Rock
Record Label: Capitol (ST-2553)
Country/Region of Manufacture: U.S.
Release Year: 1966
Format: 12-Inch, 33rpm
Special Attributes: Sealed First State, Stereo “Butcher Cover”
Record Grading: Mint (M)
Sleeve Grading: Mint (M)
Seller: Heritage Auctions
Seller’s Comments: “Beatles Yesterday And Today Sealed First State Stereo “Butcher Cover” LP in GEM MINT 10 Condition (Capitol, 1966). This was the ninth US release by Capitol Records, June 20, 1966. The title was based on the inclusion of the hit “Yesterday.” As always with Capitol, the album was a mish-mash of songs and has no British counterpart at all: two cuts were from the UK Help! LP; four tracks from the UK version of their previous LP Rubber Soul; both sides of the single “Day Tripper / We Can Work it Out” are included; and also three songs from their not-yet-released Revolver album. The Beatles resented how their US record company did this as they always put a lot of thought and effort into the tracks and order on all their UK albums. The (in)famous “butcher” photo was taken early in 1966 by Robert Whitaker and actually had a title: A Somnambulant Adventure. Whether or not it was a Vietnam protest or a protest against Capitol “butchering” their records, the fact is that it became the official album cover and when first seen by DJs and record stores, there was an immediate and negative reaction to its graphic nature. Capitol recalled all the “offensive” albums and, in many cases, glued what’s generally called the “Trunk Cover” over it (known as a “second state”). This is how most people have seen it. The original albums that were saved from destruction or the glue-over process, such as this one, are known as being “first state.” Condition: GEM-MT 10 with some minor yellowing on the white borders from age, as would be expected. Record pressing plant code on the reverse is “2” indicating that it was produced at the Scranton, Pennsylvania plant.

A very limited number of “first state” albums got out and were kept by journalists, radio stations, and record company executives. In 1966, stereo had yet to take over the marketplace (for one thing, they cost more than the mono copies); it has been estimated that mono was produced in a ten to one ration over the stereo version. There were certainly fewer of these that found their way into collections. Again, a much smaller number of these were never removed from their shrink wrap. An infinitesimal number of those still-sealed examples were kept in the beautiful condition of this one. Don’t let this opportunity pass you by! We feel certain that this is a virtually unimprovable example of this incredibly rare and hugely collectible album. There’s possibly not a serious Beatle record (or memorabilia) collector alive that doesn’t already have or would love to own any example of a “Butcher Cover”. As a first generation Beatle fan, your writer can still remember the day in 1984 that I bought my first example of this legendary piece of pop culture. It was a nicely-peeled “third state” example at a record store in Austin, Texas, and I was thrilled to have finally acquired one; I still have it. I would certainly love to have this one, but I’m happy just to have had it on my desk for a while today.

Included with the album is a typed letter signed by the Acting Director stating that the current owner had purchased it from the Greenfield Community College Library when it was deaccessioned in 1990; it had originally been part of an estate donated to the college in 1979.”

About Patrick Prince

Patrick Prince is the Editor of Goldmine

Leave a Reply