Breaking News: Monkees’ Davy Jones dies at age 66

By Susan Sliwicki

Pop musician Davy Jones, perhaps best known as one of The Monkees, died Feb. 29, 2012, of an apparent heart attack, according to media and official reports.

The artist’s official web site, www.davyjones.net, was temporarily offline in wake of the news. Jones, 66, rose to fame as a member of The Monkees, particularly for his performance of the song “Daydream Believer.”

The Monkees

The Monkees (from left) Mike Nesmith, Davy Jones, Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz. Photo courtesy Rhino Records.

David Jones — who shared the same name as the British singer better known as David Bowie — was born Dec. 30, 1945, in Manchester, England, according to the Web site allmusic.com. Before finding pop stardom and teen idol status, Jones acted in the theater and also worked as a jockey.

Jones was brought together with Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork for the TV show “The Monkees,” which ran for two seasons from 1966 to 1968. Sometimes referred to as the Pre-Fab Four due to the way the band was “cast” for television, the group took a lot of critical flak for its lack of instrumental skill.

Before The Monkees disbanded in 1969, it left behind a legacy of catchy pop tunes, including “Steppin’ Stone,” “Valleri,” “Pleasant Valley Sunday,” “Last Train To Clarksville,” “I Wanna Be Free” and “A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You,” as well as the albums “Headquarters,” “The Birds, The Bees and The Monkees,” “Monkees” and “Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones.” Like The Beatles, The Monkees also tried their hand on the silver screen with the movie “Head,” which was widely panned. After The Monkees disbanded, Jones struck out on his own for a solo career.

Pop culture fans will remember Jones’ cameos on “The Brady Bunch” (where he played himself as the object of Marcia Brady’s affection) and on “Love American Style.” The group got together again in the 1980s to tour.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Breaking News: Monkees’ Davy Jones dies at age 66

  1. Slighted for decades as plastic pre-fabs, all had musical backgrounds and were perfectly capable of creating and performing their own music. Blame Kirschner if you want. That being said, this was a good man and an ingratiating entertainer who adored his daughters and loved the horses he bred and rode. He was a decent and positive example of how a teen idol can live if he chooses rightly. Rest gently, Mr. Jones.

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