Features

Exclusive Goldmine interviews

Cliff Richard’s ‘Fabulous Rock ‘n’ Roll Songbook’ honors rock’s roots

Cliff Richard publicity photo

It’s been said that without Cliff Richard, there would be no Beatles, and without Elvis, there would be no Cliff Richard. Unfortunately, the often-overlooked English rocker’s place in American music history has been more of a missing link than that of the rock and roll linchpin he’s perceived to be in the rest of the world. Fortunately, Richard is more than ready to school you in the roots of rock, thanks to ‘The Fabulous Rock ‘N’ Roll Songbook.’

Author seeks definition of ‘Beatleness’ from those who know it best: the fans

The Beatles 1965 copyright Apple Corps Ltd.

In what she calls “the fan story of last century,” sociologist and author Candy Leonard shares the stories of scores of first-generation Beatle-lovers on what it was like to be an original fan. You won’t find interviews with band members, lovers, former roadies or anyone even remotely associated with The Beatles in “Beatleness;” these are the words a 9-year-old watching Ed Sullivan on Feb. 9, 1964, a 7-year-old who dreamed of marrying George Harrison, and the pre-teen who refused to cut his hair.

Good, bad or ugly? Get the scoop with these album reviews

thebobbleheads

Here are reviews of albums doing serious time on the CD player lately — yes, I’m old school — including Bobbleheads, Marshall Holland, Dwight Twilley, Pugwash, Marti Jones, Rob Bonfiglio, Shaen Faubert, Robert Crenshaw, Gail George, Dave Caruso, The New Trocaderos, The Connection, Edward O’Connell, The Hangabouts, Joe Sullivan, Jamie Hoover, The Jigsaw Seen, The Solicitors, Kylie Hughes, Aerial, Secret Powers and Dana Countryman.